Monday, April 12, 2010

This is sponsored content from BlogHer and KFC.



Christmas of 2008, I was flying high. I had a relatively new job that I was loving. My daughter was about to turn one. My mom was in town for the birthday celebration and for Christmas. We had all the kids’ gifts bought and it was going to be a great holiday.

We also got a new big screen but that is neither here nor there.

My precious Aunt Laura had been having some health issues that doctor’s were having trouble getting a hold of. I had known about it when I had seen her a few months before but by Thanksgiving she seemed to (maybe?) feeling a little better. My mom had casually mentioned to me that she was going to be tested for cancer but it shouldn’t amount to anything.

Here are some pictures of my aunt and me at my wedding.



Look at my aunt. Isn't she gorgeous?

Then, while my mom was in town, we got a frantic phone call from my grandmother. Not only was it cancer but it was the worst possible news we could have imagined. Started in her breast and had metastasized to her bones and other areas and organs.

No one in my family had been diagnosed with cancer before. In fact, I was so brazen to be almost confident about the fact that no one in MY family had ever been diagnosed with cancer before. That was something that affected other families. Not mine. But now, I was scared. My mom was scared. My grandparents were devastated. And I couldn’t imagine how my aunt and uncle were feeling. Not mention their three kids who were 19, 14, and 12 at the time. My baby cousin ( I can still her call her my “baby cousin” at 19, right?) was in her freshmen year of college. Think about your freshmen year of college. I cannot imagine being slammed with sort of devastating information at anytime but much less when you’re trying to figure yourself out and you’re not living close to home.

After the diagnosis, people went into action. Prayers, meal, money, gift cards, gift baskets, were all given. Family was in and out of the house helping out as much as was needed. And it was needed. My aunt had a massive fight in front of her. We are so thankful for her doctors that wanted to CURE her and not just TREAT her. Not that it was/is easy, in anyway. The first few months of chemo were more rough than anything I could ever imagine. But how fortunate we are to live in a time when the thought of curing cancer is something doable.

Everyone knows cancer is scary. I think if you asked any given woman what her greatest fear is, one of the top ones would be being diagnosed with breast cancer. One in eight women in the United States will be diagnosed with breast cancer during her lifetime. That’s a friend. That’s a relative. Susan G. Komen for the Cure is the world’s largest non-profit breast cancer organization and they have invested almost $1.5 billion in cancer research and community programs. Think about the pink ribbon. You know what it means, don’t you?

Survivors.

That’s what we want. That’s why we fight. That’s what my Aunt Laura will be. Today she’s doing great. She’s feeling healthy and more importantly, she’s feeling hopeful.

KFC is joining the cause through Buckets for the Cure. You can look for the special pink buckets at participating KFC restaurants. The buckets will feature the names of those who have survived and those who have died. For every Pink Bucket, KFC makes a 50 cent contribution to Susan G. Komen for the Cure. The Pink buckets will be available in KFC restaurants through May 23rd

Want to do something? Go buy some KFC in the pink bucket. (I mean, come on, who doesn’t want a bucket of chicken goodness?) Help KFC make the single largest donation ever in the fight against breast cancer.

Want to do something more? You can donate at bucketsforthecure.com

Want to do something easy? BlogHer will donate $1 for every comment left on the blog posts and across the other posts from the Exclusive Offer page at BlogHer.com, up to a total of $1000 for the entire program. You just have to answer one question: What do you do to make a difference in the lives of others? And don’t be afraid to brag on yourself

31 comments:

Jessica said...

a topic so near and dear to my heart...my mom is a 20-year breast cancer survivor, yet my sister-in-law's mom passed away from breast cancer over 20 years ago. i walk in the race for the cure every year i can. it's pretty amazing to be walking among so many survivors.

mydogumentary said...

I have been one of the lucky ones who has not had cancer directly affect my life. (I'm knocking on wood as we speak)As for doing something for others: I should probably do more. Even though I haven't been directly affected, I should probably do something to help others. The least I could do is buy a pink bucket of chicken, right?

Natalie Hudkins said...

Thanks for sharing that story- I am someone who always thinks it won't happen to me or my family. However, because of Jess' mom, I did buy a pink bucket yesterday. :)

Jessica said...

Love the photos! Your aunt is beautiful, and her story has inspired me for a long time. What a blessing that she's kicking cancer's butt! :)

Christa said...

First off, congrats to your aunt for rocking the treatments. That is some seriously tough stuff and I'm glad she's hopeful and feeling good. My dad's mom died of breast cancer when he was young and so the Komen foundation has always meant quite a bit to me even though I never met her. There's definately a ton that I could/should be doing to help others but one that I am doing and that relates directly to medicine is that I volunteer with some co-workers once a month at the Ronald McDonald House bringing, making and serving dinner. It's really a great place and it's cool to be able to have dinner with someone who really needs to talk, even if it's about what you brought for dinner.

I'm going to link to your post so I hope lots of comments come your way and the full amount of donation can be met!

Jamie said...

I think its hard to find anyone who doesn't have somebody in their family with breast cancer. So kudos to you for helping raise more awareness with the Komen Foundation.

Also, I just read a lot of your blog, like read it for an hour. I laughed out loud so many times, so thank you for that!

loveintheheartland said...

Thank you for sharing your story! Your aunt is a fighter and an inspiration to all women, whether we are fighting the disease or not.

I would like to mention this on my blog in hopes of reaching more people and gathering more donations.

-Brittney R

chandra said...

Love the post and the awareness you are raising. My great grandma was a survivor and my grandma is a survivor. We will be buying a bucket soon.

OK Chick said...

I'm happy to hear she is doing well.
Someday there will be a cure for cancer. There are too many people out there trying to support research!

Hi, I'm Ginny said...

What a wonderful post Emily. Cancer has been touched my cancer in lots of different ways and forms. It is a scary beast. I try to be involved in events that support good causes. I'm doing the Fight for Clean Air stair run this Saturday in Tulsa. It raises money for tobacco free education for kids. Both of my dad's parents were smokers and both passed away from cancer.

Andrea said...

Thank you so much for sharing the story of your Aunt, and for participating in this wonderful campaign to raise awareness!

~Andrea
http://blog.sweetlifesite.com

Chara said...

My grandmother had breast cancer when she died. She had many other issues at the time and they never actually got around to treating it. It makes me wonder about my own chances of getting it.

rdh97j said...

I'm not sure that I can claim to have done all that much. But I am commenting in honor of my MIL who is fighting the fight right now! She is sporting a prosthetic chest and a wig, but she has never been more beautiful!!!

cassie said...

I am one of the millions of people who have been affected by cancer. My mom is a 4 year survivor of two types of breast cancer in one breast. My sister in law was diagnosed one year and one day from her last mammogram. It is so important to not put off your mammo even a month. Every day counts towards your survival.

Sally Rountree said...

I also lost my dear aunt. She passed in February 2010. I loved that woman something fierce. So? What did I do to make a difference? I signed up for the Susan G. Komen 3 Day for the Cure walk in Atlanta, formed a team, and started fundraising and training! I had to do something, right?

SuzSpeaks said...

What a great post Emily! I grew up at Pleasant Ridge w/ Phillip and Laura... my sister and I babysat for them :) Had no idea she was your aunt! She is beautiful! I'm so thankful she is doing well!

This Eclectic Life said...

Best wishes to Aunt Laura. She is beautiful ... and so are you for sharing her story. Together we can beat cancer. Here's to more survivors!

Allison G said...

Thank you for sharing your story! My mom is a survivor, and our family supports all of the efforts of the Susan G. Komen Foundation!

lopsided blogger said...

Thanks for sharing this story. Let's find a cure for this thing NOW!

Anonymous said...

This is a great story, I know because I lived it with Laura. You see. I am her sister, Susan. I was with her as much as I possibly could be. I was her cheerleader, her comdedy girl. I believe when things get really bad just throw some levity in it and lighten the load. We prayed so hard and God gave us what we asked for. She came close to death but God saw fit that she stay with her husband and kids and the rest of us.

Bonggamom said...

Here's another $1 towards the cause. Thanks for sharing your story!

priscilla said...

i absolutely LOVE reading stories of survivors, like your aunt laura. so glad that she's fought the battle and won. thanks for writing this and supporting a great cause.

Anonymous said...

=) im proud to play a small part.

Cha Cha said...

Emily, thanks for sharing your story. I'm so glad that Laura is doing well. What an inspiration.

Karina said...

Thank you so much for sharing your story

Susan Easley said...

A good friend of mine is training for a 3-day, 60 mile race for the cure so this topic is close to my heart right now!

Bev Sykes said...

Thanks for your story. I'm going to find out if pink buckets have made it to this part of the country!

Deb said...

Love your post, and this awareness campaign. Thanks for making it so easy to offer a bit of help towards a cure!

sarah said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
Kelly said...

Both my mother's parents died from cancer, so I would love to help cancer research as much as possible.

Laurie said...

Beautiful post, and lovely pictures of your aunt. I do a lot for Komen in DFW. Everything from volunteering for the Race for the Cure series to fundraising and walking in the events and 3-Day. My husband lost his mom, so this is very near and dear to my family's heart. I am glad that KFC and Blogher are getting involved.